My Penn Path: An ISP Journey

By Rachel Weinstein, C’20

As someone who graduated from high school in a class of seventy, entering the community of nearly ten thousand undergraduates at Penn was certainly daunting. However, I was fortunate enough to be admitted to the Benjamin Franklin Scholars Program, which, as a student in the College, meant that I would spend my freshman year in the Integrated Studies Program (ISP). ISP is a fully immersive first year experience at Penn, in which a cohort of eighty students lives together in the Quad, takes two rigorous courses together each semester, and works to integrate the material from these two separate courses both inside and outside of the classroom. First semester, our course load consisted of Art History and Religious Studies. We spent time discussing the intersection of the two disciplines through weekly lectures, seminars, field trips, and conversations in the Quad. The courses also enabled me to explore my new home in Philadelphia, through frequent trips to the Philadelphia Art Museum and SEPTA rides to Mormon, Buddhist, and Masonic Temples. As a Cognitive Science major, I enjoyed second semester as well, in which we took Evolutionary Psychology and Philosophy.

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ISP was the hallmark of my freshman year, and it shaped my path at Penn in ways that I could never have imagined. For starters, it exposed me to subject areas that I had absolutely no experience with, and it forced me to venture out of my academic comfort zone. Every day, I was having conversations that allowed me to think abstractly and forge connections between seemingly disparate (and largely new) areas of study. I was challenged, I was engaged, and I was working hard but enjoying it all. Furthermore, ISP introduced to me the idea of interdisciplinary learning, which would come to be defining of my major and minor choices. I went to a magnet science high school, where the closest that we came to interdisciplinary learning was taking biology and chemistry labs at the same time. Because of ISP, I recognized that distinct disciplines spanning the humanities and hard sciences could benefit from collaboration. Now, I am pursuing a Cognitive Science major, but with an independent concentration that I created in Neuroeconomics. I spend my days studying the intersection of neuroscience, economics, and marketing for my major, along with statistics and psychology for my minors, all with the goal of better understanding consumer behavior. ISP showed me that tackling an issue from several angles could help in developing new and innovative ideas.

ISP

It is also important to note that ISP was about so much more than academics. Through ISP, I met people from all over the world (there were 16 countries represented on my hall!) and I made some of my best friends. I explored Philadelphia, made connections with my peers and some of the most renowned professors at Penn, and I found a strong community. I really cannot imagine what my life at Penn would have been like had I not been a part of ISP!

 

 

Rachel is a sophomore in the College majoring in Cognitive Science with an individualized concentration in Neuroeconomics and minoring in Psychology and Statistics. In addition to being a Ben Franklin Scholar, she is currently serving as co-chair of the Penn Traditions committee. Rachel is also involved in College Cognoscenti, MUSE Consulting, Admissions Dean’s Advisory Board, Wharton Neuroscience Initiative, Greek life, and Peer advising.

 

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Reaching Out to West Philadelphia: The Work of the Netter Center and Penn in the Neighborhood

By: Jorge Penado, C’19
International Relations Major
Work-Study Student, Sweeten Alumni House

DSC_1200.jpg

Source: Netter Center Collection

Since the second half of the 19th century with the move of the university from the 9th and Market/ Chestnut region, the University of Pennsylvania has shared a common land with the community of West Philadelphia. Though our geographical neighbor, learning and venturing out into the community is not traditionally prioritized by the average Penn student who tends to stay within the university limits. But, though the average Penn student doesn’t explore the neighborhood as much, this does not mean that Penn is isolated from West Philadelphia. There are various departments, centers and individuals who work directly with West Philadelphia, and one in particular that has led noteworthy efforts in engaging Penn in West Philadelphia has been the Netter Center for Community Partnerships.

The Netter Center was formally opened as the Center for Community Partnerships in 1992, but the efforts for community partnerships had been established a few years prior. In 1983, Penn’s Office of Community-Oriented Policy Studies was created to help connect institutional initiatives with West Philadelphia, including through the West Philadelphia Partnership. Two years later in 1985, the idea of academically based community service (ABCS) began when Penn students presented a research proposal for a summer job training corps for West Philadelphia youth as part of their honors seminar class taught by Ira Harkavy and Lee Benson. Soon after, the official center would be established to create and manage projects and programs that saw various individuals, particularly Penn students and faculty, mutually engage with West Philadelphia. Nowadays, the Netter Center, under founding director Ira Harkavy’s (C’70, GR’79) leadership, runs numerous programs throughout the academic and summer terms with programs like the aforementioned ABCS courses, traditional service programs, and community development initiatives, as outlined on their website.

With this general background in mind, one can begin to explore the opportunities and services that the center offers to the average student and even to alumni. In order to learn even more about the center, we reached out to the current assistant director, Rita Hodges (C’05, GED’15), to learn from a representative of the center, and after a short conversation, many services, programs, and initiatives were highlighted that exemplify the mission of the center. As an assistant director and former undergraduate student involved in the center, the insight the conversation provided was helpful in understanding these projects. First and foremost, as assistant director, Hodges does quite a bit at the center which includes supporting the internal operations of the center, overseeing marketing and communication, working with development and alumni operations, and working closely with the director and associate director on replication outreach activities. One interesting project that the center is working on would have to be the replication outreach initiatives which sees the center participate in the creation of a network of colleges and universities around the nation that are improving relations with their local neighborhoods through conferences, workshops, and continued partnership. The center additionally engages in helping establish regional training centers on university-assisted community schools and has recently worked to establish one at UCLA.

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Source: Netter Center Collection

Outside of this position, other services the center offers include ABCS courses, averaging about 70 per year in 30 different departments, internships, work and volunteer opportunities, and extensive work in local schools to help create centers that benefit the local population, both local students and parents through its university-assisted community schools program. There are mentoring and tutoring programs, STEM related programs, that help expose students to STEM fields through lessons and activities run by Penn undergraduate and graduate students, and programs focused on literacy, health and nutrition, arts and culture, college access, career readiness, sports and basically anything you can think of! The opportunities, however, are not just for current students as the alumni network and opportunities are just as substantial. The center maintains a relationship with alumni by running various events such as volunteering during alumni weekend or class reunions. Many Netter Center alumni maintain a solid relationship with the center by coming back for events like panels and volunteering. One event that the center helps run is the Basketball Clinic that sees alumni, their children, local children and Penn’s basketball players from the 1979 Final Four Team come together to play basketball for a day. The diversity of events and services offered clearly extends much farther than one can imagine.

With all of this in mind, the question arises as to how the relationship between the two has changed over time. Through a long history, the relationship between the neighborhood and the institution, while not always perfect, has definitely improved. Various departments, besides the Netter Center, have engaged with the community. In particular, one department that stands out is Penn Athletics who has been partnering with neighborhood schools to help students learn and participate in sports like track & field and lacrosse through the Young Quakers Community Athletics program that it runs in partnership with the Netter Center. After speaking with Assistant Director Hodges, it was made clear that President Amy Gutmann has made it a priority in her presidency to engage the community more in a mutually beneficial way, not only through academic partnerships with Penn students and faculty, but also by overseeing various initiatives on the business side of things such as working on economic inclusion and helping small businesses. Ultimately, while the relationship has definitely improved and seems to be heading in a much better direction, there is still so much work to be done between the neighborhood and the institution. There are still ties to develop between Penn and local schools and increased interaction between students and residents through pathways like ABCS courses. The work will continue as the relationship between Penn and West Philadelphia becomes even more mutually beneficial, allowing Penn to be a support institution for the neighborhood while it enhances its own research, teaching, learning, and service.

Ultimately, as mentioned above, the history of Penn and West Philadelphia could fill an entire book and this post is too short to do it justice, but the takeaway is hopefully one of awareness. As they celebrate their 25th anniversary, the work of the Netter Center has been developing and strengthening ties between the neighbors, and their work should be highlighted in order to hopefully allow more people, students, and alumni, to participate in the variety of programs they offer and to continue developing that connection.

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Have You Met the Gibson Girl?

By: Jorge Penado, C’19
International Relations Major
Work-Study Student, Sweeten Alumni House

Who would have known that postcards on Penn’s campus in the late 19th century and early 20th century could bring light to a phenomenon happening across the United States? When one first takes a look at these postcards, as depicted above, it wouldn’t necessarily raise an eyebrow. The image is simply of a woman dressed in Penn garb or carrying a red and blue flag. At first glance, they simply look like a depiction of someone with exuberant school spirit, a billowing flag and extravagant outerwear. However, once we take a look past the initial image, the history of these postcards reveals a sociopolitical movement in the US and how it spread to Penn’s campus. These so-called “College Girls” or “Gibson Girls” took the nation by storm in the late 1800s and early 1900s, but besides being an artistic illustration, they also represent a complicated era in the history of the nation.

Who is the “Gibson Girl”? The Gibson Girl was the personification of feminine beauty and attractiveness in the United States largely during the Gilded Age. This ideal representation of women was usually portrayed through pen-and-ink illustrations that depicted an upper-middle-class woman with a small waist, upswept hair, a perfect outfit and a detached nature. This form of illustration was initially started by Charles Dana Gibson who was an American graphic artist from New York City. The Gibson Girl, at first, was a creation of Gibson to satirize the upper class while also being a representation of the beauty standards of that time that he says he saw on the streets of New York. With regards to Penn, the Gibson Girl had an alternative name, simply the College Girl, which various elite colleges used to portray their own university and were placed on postcards. The Gibson Girl soon became a trend that other artists adopted. This trend seems simple at first but can be interpreted in various ways.

womens-suffrage

Source: Borgen Magazine

However, before we explore some of these interpretations, let’s go back 100+ years in time to the late 19th century and early 20th century. Where was the nation, and particularly Penn, at that time in relation to women? For one, the Women’s Suffrage Movement was in full force in the country. While we all know women’s suffrage wasn’t nationally established until 1920 when the 19th Amendment was accepted, the idea of women’s suffrage had been introduced as early as the 1840s. The famous Seneca Falls Convention was held in 1848. The first national suffrage organizations were established in 1869 by pioneers like Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Lucy Stone. Susan B. Anthony was arrested and taken to the Supreme Court in United States v. Susan B. Anthony for voting in the 1872 presidential election. Senator Aaron A. Sargent introduced a women’s suffrage amendment to Congress in 1878. The leading National American Woman Suffrage Association was created in 1890. There is no doubt that the role and rights of women in American society were being challenged during this era and that suffrage advocacy was on the rise.

Now, while this was a nationwide view, there was simultaneously a Penn movement during this era. The late 19th century saw a variety of achievements and changes in the way Penn was run in relation to women. This era was the time in which various women were officially accepted into the schools of Penn and granted diplomas. In 1878, Anna Lockhart Flanigen and Gertrude Klein Peirce were the first women to complete a collegiate course of study at Penn. In 1879, the Trustees announced that “persons of both sexes are now admitted,” to various departments in the College, the School of Engineering and to the Department of Music. In 1880, the School of Auxiliary Medicine admitted its first women students. In 1881, the Law School admitted its first woman student. In 1882, the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences was the first to admit women to courses leading to a degree. And the list goes on. For Penn in particular, this was a clear shift in the access to education that women were getting after years of self-advocacy. There are various records of women attending open lectures at Penn or being enrolled as “special students” for years beforehand without ever gaining full access. After years of pushing, the tide began to shift.

Now, with all of this in mind, we can much more clearly begin to evaluate what role the Gibson Girl played in society. Particularly, some argue that the Gibson Girl became a depiction of the social anxieties that came with the changing role of women in American society. The various achievements of women in society and college brought about a fear that women would not be satisfied with traditionally domestic life and would alter their role as an educated woman. It became a much more conservative depiction that seemed to focus on the frivolous, playful pursuits of women as a means to reassure people who were afraid of the changing roles. The Gibson Girl was contrasted with the New Woman because of the belief that she wouldn’t involve herself in politics and would thus not join the suffrage movement unlike the latter. While many saw the Gibson Girl as a new interpretation of the American woman who was independent and active, others saw her as conservatively trying to address the changing role of women.

At first glance, these beautiful sketch images seemed to be simple and representative of Penn’s school spirit. However, once we take a deeper look, we begin to see a much more complicated history in a time where society was changing. While the depictions are now an interesting thing to take in as art, it is equally as important to understand the backstory and the resilience of women of this era who fought for their right to education and right to vote such to create a better world for women in the US now.

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The Penn Ten: Ten Lessons I Have Learned While at Penn

By Samantha Grasso, C’18

Always Be Open to Meeting New People: The point of attending college is to receive an education.  I can state with confidence that I have learned a lot inside the classroom while at Penn, but my experience has been special because of the people.  There are several individuals who have transformed my college career. What is interesting though is that I did not meet them, until junior year.  Although it is important to maintain relationships, never be afraid to say “hi” to an unfamiliar face and establish a new connection.      IMG_5027

Take Advantage of Office Hours: I have always been THAT student who attends office hours and asks a lot of questions.  The secret is that professors actually enjoy this. Professors teach because they are passionate about doing so.  Attend office hours to increase your understanding of class material, but also to get to know your professors; they are people too!

Join Extracurricular Activities that Force You to Step Outside of Your Comfort Zone: I never thought I would be a member of a sorority or an improv society, but I am a member of both.  Penn has over a hundred undergraduate organizations, so become involved with at least one of them.  You can join one to expand your network or to simply have fun, but never be afraid to take the leap.  When I have deviated from my normal, I have grown the most.

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Explore Philadelphia: Penn Students are fortunate because they attend school in one of America’s greatest cities.  Philadelphia has restaurants, entertainment, shopping, and more, so it is important to take advantage.  You should make an effort to go off of Penn’s campus once a week and explore the city.  Doing so will only enhance your time at Penn.

Always Make Time for the People and Things You Love: Penn is an academically rigorous institution.  While it is great to be challenged, sometimes you forget that a world exists beyond the library.  Although it is easier said than done, make time to do activities you enjoy or see people who make you happy in the midst of studying or doing work.

IMG_8834Be You: Everyone at Penn is intelligent, talented, and incredible.  It is a great feeling being a part of this dynamic student body, yet it can be overwhelming because you might start to compare yourself to others; you should never do this.  By measuring yourself against others, you lose sight of who you are.  Being who you are is what got you into Penn, so be unapologetically you each and every day.

Reach Out to Alumni: Use QuakerNet!  This resource allows you to connect with Penn Alumni.  Penn Alumni love hearing from current students, so reach out to them if you have questions about your major or career.

Become Familiar with Perspective: Every student at Penn has received a bad grade or experienced some form of rejection.  In the moment, these things can make it seem as if the sky is falling; that is never the case.  This means whenever you are overwhelmed, take a step back and reconsider the situation with a more optimistic lens.

Attend Events: It is impossible to be bored at Penn.  Every night there is some event you can attend.  Whether it be a sporting event or a performance, it is happening on Penn’s campus.

Start Each Day with a Good Mood: Ever since I was young, my dad has said, “When you wake up, you can be in a good mood or a bad mood.  Choose the good mood.”  This advice has been extremely helpful, while I have been at Penn because when I choose to start each day in a good mood, my days automatically become better.  If you begin your day with positivity, Penn cannot throw anything at you that you cannot handle.  Instead, each day at Penn becomes better than the previous one.

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Samantha is a senior majoring in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics with a concentration in Choice and Behavior. In addition to being a co-chair of the Penn Traditions committee, she also belongs to the College Dean’s Advisory Board, Seniors for The Penn Fund, Penn Improv Society, Media and Entertainment Club, Penn Wharton Entrepreneurship, and Sigma Kappa Sorority.

 

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Commencement Again – 25 Years Later

By Kiera Reilly, C’93, Lisa Nass Grabelle, C’93, L’96, and Heidi Howard Tandy, C’92
One of many Penn traditions is the alumni parade of classes during Commencement. The University’s Commencement ceremony is traditionally held on the Monday immediately following Alumni Weekend.
Penn Commencement in Franklin Field

Penn Commencement in Franklin Field

Graduates gather in various spots around campus ahead of the ceremony and then march with their undergraduate or graduate school classmates down Locust Walk, past Van Pelt and College Hall, then across 34th Street, by the Engineering buildings and arrive at Franklin Field for the Commencement ceremony.
Lining Locust Walk as the graduates process is the alumni parade of classes.  Representatives from every undergraduate class year stand on either side of Locust Walk, holding their class flag and cheering for the graduates. There are two special groups among the alumni procession – the 25th and 50 reunion classes.
Penn Commencement alumni class representatives

Walking through the Alumni Class representatives in front of the Sweeten Alumni House on Locust Walk

Penn tradition honors the 25th Reunion class by inviting us to march in the commencement procession. We strongly encourage you to remain on campus through commencement. It is the happiest day of the year at Penn, and it is very special to see the new graduates proceed down Locust Walk, lined on either side by Penn Alumni.
Penn Commencement 1993 Hillary Rodham Clinton

Commencement at Penn 1993, marching past Commencement Speaker First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and Penn President Sheldon Hackney

We invite you to re-live the happy day twenty-five years ago when we graduated from Penn by joining us and your fellow 1993 classmates and walking as a class in the alumni procession into Franklin Field for commencement. The deadline to register to join us is Sunday, April 1st. Click here to register now!
Penn Class of 1993 senior class board commencement

Led by class president Michael Scoops Rosenband and the Senior Class Board, the Penn Class of 1993 enters Franklin Field for Commencement, May 1993

Last year, member of the Class of 1992 marched in Commencement, and Heidi Howard Tandy, C’92, shared her thoughts with us:

The experience of walking with your class down Locust Walk in cap and gown isn’t just a once-in-a-lifetime experience; being able to march at your 25th reunion (and your 50th) gives you another moment to reconnect with your classmates on Commencement Morning, and celebrate the new graduates with applause, cheers and a magical Hurrah! Hurrah! And if you don’t remember what it was like to walk into Franklin Field on Commencement Day, here’s your chance to refresh your recollections!

Penn Commencement Class of 1992 25th reunion

The Class of 1992 celebrates their 25th Penn reunion by marching in Commencement, May 2017.

Class of 1993 President Lisa Nass Grabelle has represented our class many times at commencement. She highly recommends that you join us!
As our class president I have had the honor to march in graduation several times over the years, carrying our class flag in the alumni procession, as well as marching in 1996 at my Penn Law graduation with lots of fellow Penn Law/Penn ’93 grads.  To be among a literal sea of Penn graduates and alumni is a moving experience.  It reminds me of the excitement I felt the first time I marched during our graduation with my best friends and housemates (4049 Locust) by my side.  While marching today is so different since there are tons of cell phones being held up to capture the experience and no more Palladium to pass by, the Penn tradition is very much the same as it was for us in 1993, and I am sure way back for decades and decades.  I hope that many of you choose to join me and the Class of 93 as we march on Monday after reunion weekend to celebrate our 25th anniversary.  This is an honor the University bestows on us to be recognized for our special and BIG reunion!

Commencement Information

The University of Pennsylvania’s 262nd Commencement ceremony will take place on Monday, May 14, 2018 in Franklin Field at 10:15 a.m., and will be preceded by student and academic processions through campus. The ceremony will feature the conferral of degrees, the awarding of honorary degrees, greetings by University officials, and remarks by the Commencement speaker, Andrea Mitchell, CW’67, Chief Foreign Affairs Correspondent, NBC News and Host of “Andrea Mitchell Reports,” MSNBC. To see the complete list of honorary degree recipients, click here.

If you are marching with our class, start time is 8 AM for Continental Breakfast and Robing. The procession across campus begins at 9 AM; with the ceremony beginning at 10:15 AM. Rain or shine. A light lunch is provided after Commencement in Sweeten Alumni House.

You can register to participant when you register for our 25th Reunion.

You must RSVP by April 1 to order regalia and be listed in the Commencement Program.

 

Penn Class of 1993 25th Reunion #93tothe25th

Penn Class of 1993 25th Reunion Countdown

The weekend of February 23 – 24, marked 11 weeks until the 25th Reunion of the Penn Class of 1993 (May 11 – 14, 2018)! Meet us at the Button!

Register NOW to attend our 25th Reunion!

Join us we count down the weeks to our reunion #93tothe25th:

  • Follow us on Twitter, Tumblr, and Instagram.
  • Classmates are invited to join our Facebook and LinkedIn groups.
  • Donate to The Penn Fund in honor of our reunion! We want to break the 25th reunion participation giving record and every gift matters!
  • Do you have old photos or mementos from our time at Penn? Photos of Spring Fling? Football at Franklin Field? Classes at DRL? We are taking a trip down memory lane and would love for you to share your memories with our class in a future post. Please email us upenn1993@gmail.com!

Book Your Hotel Room for Alumni Weekend NOW!

The Marriott Downtown (where we had a Penn 1993 and a Penn Alumni room block) is sold out for Alumni Weekend. There are alternative hotels nearby. Some classmates are booking via AirBnB. We recommend booking ASAP! Please see our class website for additional details.

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Photos, Videos and Songs of Penn 1993

By Kiera Reilly, C’93, and Heidi Howard Tandy, C’92

Five years ago at our 20th reunion party, we showed this video in McClelland Hall. Heidi Howard Tandy, C’92, made the video using photos from our class, some video clips (yes we had video back in 1993), and songs that were popular when we were students.

Take fifteen minutes, watch the video, see if it brings you back to a happy time 25 years ago at Penn, and then click on this link and register to join us at our 25th Reunion!

Meet us at the Button!

Register for our 25th Reunion!

Penn Class of 1993 25th Reunion Countdown

The weekend of January 26 – 27, marked 15 weeks until the 25th Reunion of the Penn Class of 1993 (May 11 – 14, 2018)! Meet us at the Button!

Register NOW to attend our 25th Reunion!

Join us we count down the weeks to our reunion #93tothe25th:

  • Do you have old photos or mementos from our time at Penn? Photos of Spring Fling? Football at Franklin Field? Classes at DRL? We are taking a trip down memory lane and would love for you to share your memories with our class in a future post. Please email us upenn1993@gmail.com!
  • Follow us on Twitter, Tumblr, and Instagram.
  • Classmates are invited to join our Facebook and LinkedIn groups.
  • Donate to The Penn Fund in honor of our reunion! We want to break the 25th reunion participation giving record and every gift matters!

Book Your Hotel Room for Alumni Weekend NOW!

The Marriott Downtown (where we had a Penn 1993 and a Penn Alumni room block) is sold out for Alumni Weekend. There are alternative hotels nearby. Some classmates are booking via AirBnB. We recommend booking ASAP! Please see our class website for additional details.

Penn Class of 1993 25th Reunion #93tothe25th

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Remembering Tough Seasons with Penn Football

By Frank Caccuro, C’93
1992 Penn Football team photo

The 1992 Penn Football team photo (pictured in Poor Richard’s Record).

Prior to coming to University of Pennsylvania, Penn Football won the Ivy League Championship seven of the previous eight years.  After our class committed to Penn, Head Coach Ed Zubrow resigned from Penn to take a job fighting drug abuse with the Philadelphia school district.  We entered our Freshman year with a new coach, Gary Steele who was an assistant under Coach Zubrow.  We still had great expectations that we would continue the Ivy League dominance and have several Ivy Championships by the time we graduated.

Unlike other Division 1 schools, Penn had a Freshman Football program which did not start until the first week of school and was an abbreviated football schedule.  While our freshman team had a good year with a 6-2 record, our varsity team did not do as well, finishing 2-8.  In our sophomore and junior years, we didn’t do any better, finishing 3-7 and 2-8.   At the end of our junior season, the Athletic Department decided a change in Coaching staff was necessary and hired Coach Al Bagnoli.   Coach Bagnoli brought a ray of hope to our senior season.  We started our senior season with a record of 4-2 with only one loss in the Ivy League entering the Penn-Princeton game.  With a win against Princeton, we would be tied for first place and in the driver’s seat to get our first Ivy League Championship.    We travelled up to Princeton’s Palmer stadium on a sunny fall day to reclaim the Ivy League Championship for Penn.  We trailed the entire game but entered the 4th quarter down by 6.   We had two great drives in the 4th quarter to take the lead.   On the first drive, we drove all way down to the five-yard line but missed a field goal to cut the lead to 3.
We still had plenty of time. After stopping Princeton on a three-and-out, we got the ball back with 2:10 remaining and led a dramatic drive to the Tigers’ 23. On the last play of the game, we got sacked by Michael Lerch, a 5-foot-7-inch, 160-pound wide receiver who occasionally plays defensive end on passing situations.  We lost 20-14.  It was the toughest loss in my career and I still recall that play vividly.  I mentioned the WR’s name because it is a name I will never forget.  We ended the season, 7-3.
While the 1993 Class did not win a Championship, we are proud that we started a 25-game win streak, a Division I-AA record.  Our younger teammates went on to win the next two Ivy League Championships, finishing 19-1!
Twenty-five years later, I still think about the Princeton loss and what could have been if Coach Bagnoli was hired our freshman year. While I would like to exchange wins with other teams, I would not exchange any of my teammates.  Whenever I see a fellow teammate, it brings a smile to my face.
Hope to see you soon.  Do better than your best!
Penn Football Coach Lake #93tothe25th

Coach Lake

Coach “Lake” Staffieri played college football at the University of Maryland and was a member of the Terps’ 1953 national championship team, playing in four bowl games: Orange Bowls (two), Gator and Sugar. Dan joined the University of Pennsylvania’s staff in 1977 as head freshman coach under Head Coach Harry Gamble. For the next 34-years, he was an assistant football coach and all-around supporter of Penn. Dan was a very recognizable figure on campus.  He was usually dressed in red and blue plaid pants, a red blazer, and a jeff cap. During football season, he could be seen and heard on Fridays before home games driving the Penn helmet cart around campus and using his megaphone to raise school spirit. During game day, he would have a piece of tape on his forehead with different messages.

Dan had numerous phrases that we would chant like

“Do better than your best!”
“Setbacks pave the way for comebacks”
and
“I! V! Y! CHAMPS!!”
Coach Lake passed away in 2010 at the age of 85 from cancer of the bladder.

Penn Class of 1993 25th Reunion Countdown

The weekend of January 19 – 20, marked 16 weeks until the 25th Reunion of the Penn Class of 1993 (May 11 – 14, 2018)! Meet us at the Button!

Register NOW to attend our 25th Reunion!

Join us we count down the weeks to our reunion #93tothe25th:

  • Do you have old photos or mementos from our time at Penn? Photos of Spring Fling? Football at Franklin Field? Classes at DRL? We are taking a trip down memory lane and would love for you to share your memories with our class in a future post. Please email us upenn1993@gmail.com!
  • Follow us on Twitter, Tumblr, and Instagram.
  • Classmates are invited to join our Facebook and LinkedIn groups.
  • Donate to The Penn Fund in honor of our reunion! We want to break the 25th reunion participation giving record and every gift matters!

Book Your Hotel Room for Alumni Weekend NOW!

The Marriott Downtown (where we had a Penn 1993 and a Penn Alumni room block) is sold out for Alumni Weekend. There are alternative hotels nearby. We recommend booking ASAP! Please see our class website for additional details.

Penn Class of 1993 25th Reunion #93tothe25th

 

 

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