Category Archives: Penn Law

My Top Penn List: Best Professors to Explain Washington

Author: Casey Ryan, C’95

I’m a CNN junkie. I watch Erin Burnett, Anderson Cooper, Piers Morgan and Jake Tapper regularly.  If I get out of work at 5, I head to the gym where I can view Wolf Blitzer’s Situation Room from the elliptical.  So I’ve been closely watching the government shut down and the nation’s run into the most recent spending limit cap. Last night, I watched the literal 11th hour House vote on the Senate’s bill and listened to the commentary before calling it a night.

There are so many issues in DC: laws, policy, the will of the people, healthcare, jobs, taxes, default and more. Whether or not you agree with the current vote of Congress, this quagmire has been in the news for a solid three weeks and could use a lot of clarification.  Here are my choices for Penn faculty who would do a great job to help explain the forces at work in DC.


10.      J. Sanford Schwartz, M’74, INT’78 – Dr. Schwartz is an health care policy expert, who predicted that the Affordable Healthcare Act would contentiously pass and focuses on cost-quality tradeoffs in health care, health economics, health policy and medical decision making.


9.         Michael X. Delli Carpini, C’75, G’75  – Frequently Dean Delli Carpini explores the realm of politics in this new information environment and in particular, he explores the evolution of media that has occurred over the last twenty-five years – blogs, online fundraising, citizen journalism, social networking sites, viral videos, websites – to drive political campaigns.


8.         David B. Thornburgh
– As the Executive Director, Fels Institute of Government, Mr. Thornburgh teaches Politics and Public Leadership which orients students to the constraints that characterize leadership and management in the public service focusing on the areas of  public service, policy analysis, politics, and political realism.


7.         Jeremy Siegel
– Dr. Siegel is our guru of the stock markets.  Every media event of the Congress and President seem to be orchestrated to send a message to the global markets that the US will not fail them.


6.         Olivia Mitchell
– As a professor of Business Economics and Public Policy  and of Insurance and Risk Management, Dr. Mitchell is the expert on employee benefits and compensation, health/retirement analysis & policy, international private & social insurance, labor economics & public finance and risk & crisis management.


5.         Marjorie Margolies, CW’63, PAR’91, PAR’97
– As a former Member of Congress for the 13th District of Pennsylvania, Ms. Margolies knows a thing or two about the House of Representatives which benefits her students in her class, Dealing with the Media.


4.         Julia Lynch – Dr. Lynch, Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science, studies the concerns the politics of inequality, social policy, and the economy in comparative perspective, with a focus on the countries of Western Europe and the United States.


3.         Reed Shuldiner, PAR’14 – A Professor of Law and Co-Director of the Center for Tax Law and Policy, Dr. Shuldiner is one of the nation’s top experts on the Federal income tax – best known for his seminal work on the taxation of financial products. Plus he has advised the governments of China, Lithuania, the Philippines, and South Africa on income tax issues on behalf of the International Monetary Fund and the U.S. Treasury.


2.         Joni Finney – As the Director of the Institute for Research on Higher Education, Dr. Finney’s work on higher ed espeically on issues like public finance of higher education, governance, access and accountability might shed some light on how the issues in Washington end up affecting those of us working at Penn.


1.         Mark Duggan – Professor Duggan is the Faculty Director of Wharton Public Policy Initiative. In this role, he is my number one choice to oversee that conversation that we could have with these other nine faculty members to shed some light on the power play and issues in the Beltway.

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Filed under Annenberg, Casey R., Fels Institute, GSE, Notable Alumni, Penn Law, Penn Medicine, Penn Wharton Public Policy Initiative, Research, Top Ten, Wharton

Wharton Alumnus, Rohit Chopra, Addresses Issues Related to Student Debt

Author: Lisa Marie Patzer

The Penn Wharton Public Policy Initiative is pleased to announce a talk by Wharton MBA alumnus Rohit Chopra, student loan ombudsman at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, scheduled for Thursday, September 26, at 4:30 PM, in Steinberg-Dietrich Hall, Room 109.  Chopra will be speaking on “Student Debt: The Next Financial Crisis?”

Chopra was appointed to the oimbudsman position, created by the Dodd-Frank Act, in 2011 by the Secretary of the U.S. Treasury.  In that role, he leads the agency’s work on behalf of students and young Americans.  He also is a frequent contributor to the Huffington Post on student debt issues.  Before joining the CFPB, he worked at McKinsey & Company.

This talk is open to the University community, but registration is required:
https://whartonppi.wufoo.com/forms/student-debt-the-next-financial-crisis/

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Filed under Lisa Marie Patzer, Penn Law, Penn Wharton Public Policy Initiative

Penn Student, Again!

Author: Lillian Gardiner, MSEd’11, Program Director, Institute for Law & Economics, University of Pennsylvania Law School

When I finished my Master’s program, I thought I’d never go back to school. But after a very short period of time, I actually found myself missing the classroom and having a teacher.

bueller

Now, I’m taking my first class as an alumna (and Penn staff member) and am still amazed that this is one of the benefits included in being a graduate of Penn.

As alumni, we can take courses through Penn’s College of Liberal and Professional Studies. There’s a wide variety of course offerings, with many classes offered in the evenings.

I’m currently enrolled in the Sociology of Bioethics, taught by Collette Joyce. The goal of the course is “to understand the nature of the bioethics profession and its modes of argumentation, and to explore the cultural, social, political, and professional underpinnings of bio-ethical debates.” Class meets for three hours once a week on the evening. The readings have been challenging but manageable with my work commitments. I love  being back in a classroom, learning for the sake of learning and not worrying about my grade.

If you’re local, hopefully you can take advantage of this option at some point. See you in class!

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Filed under Alumni Perspective, Lillian G., Penn Law