What You’ve Been Missing: Penn Museum 125

Author: Nicole C. Maloy, W’95

One of Penn’s most exciting resources is one that many students and alumni have never explored. Now there is a new way for you to see what you may have been missing.

The University of Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology is a gem, with permanent and traveling exhibits that offer access to rare and fascinating items from around the world. In honor of the Museum’s 125th anniversary, 125 objects in the collection are being featured on the Museum’s blog under the tag “Object of the Day.” This began on June 15, so take a look at what has been highlighted so far, and watch for an additional piece each weekday through the Museum’s birthday on December 6. Wherever you are now, don’t miss this easy chance to familiarize yourself with an amazing center of knowledge at your own alma mater.

Attic red figure amphora from Athens, Greece, around 490 BCE, featuring a winged Nike, goddess of victory.

Attic red figure amphora from Athens, Greece, around 490 BCE, featuring a winged Nike, goddess of victory.

This funerary/guardian figure from Gabon, on the West coast of Central Africa, is made of wood covered in sheets of copper and brass.

This funerary/guardian figure from Gabon, on the West coast of Central Africa, is made of wood covered in sheets of copper and brass.

Satin Mandarin square from the Qing Dynasty, China (19th century) depicting a Qilin, a mythical horse-like animal reserved for the weaves of first rank military officers.

Satin Mandarin square from the Qing Dynasty, China (19th century) depicting a Qilin, a mythical horse-like animal reserved for the weaves of first rank military officers.

This Egyptian statue from 1479-1458 BCE is made of sandstone, and pigment remains on the wig, face and hands.

This Egyptian statue from 1479-1458 BCE is made of sandstone, and pigment remains on the wig, face and hands.

You can find even more items via the Penn Museum’s new Online Collections Database, but the “Object of the Day” blog feature is great place to start. Check it out, and remember to build in a visit next time you return to campus so you, friends, and family can learn about objects like these, among many, many more.

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Filed under Historical, Nicole M., Penn Museum, Photos, Uncategorized

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